Orientalism: „Ali’s Riot Men“

Orientalism was a conceptual collaboration project of Sustained Development (Gerald Fiebig) and EMERGE (Sascha Stadlmeier).

Field recordings from China
Processed by EMERGE
Stereotyped by Orientalism
Deconstructed by Sustained Development

cover image by Michael Herbst
credits
released April 14, 2013

This side project of Sustained Development processes field recordings from the Far East (with some help from label mate EMERGE) to such an extent that they become hissing, granular sheets of sound resembling, for example, abstract Mille-Plateaux-style electronica rather than anything „concrete“. Reverb and time-stretching make the so-called „real“ sounds recorded during a trip through China into something very different, calm yet faintly ominous, far from the pseudo-documentary pose that is common in “field recordings” as a genre.

To quote Edward Said, who invented the term, “Orientalism is a Western style for dominating, restructuring, and having authority over the Orient” by creating stereotypical images of “the East.” This release by Orientalism (the title of the album and all tracks being anagrams of the word to hint at the ideological limitations of orientalist clichés) aims to subvert the stereotyping that is latent in a lot of field recordings of more or less “exotic” places because they tend to fix a limited sound image of what “the” Orient (or India, Kyoto, etc.) sounds like. In a certain way, the compositional treatment applied to the Chinese field recordings on this album insists on the right of every sound to become (abstract) music instead of just standing in as a tourist snapshot.

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Mortuarium

Based on the sounds of a live performance at „Lichtnächte“ festival 2011, the audience, and the performance space, at the „mortuarium“ (indoor gravesite) at Eichstätt cathedral. / In dem Stück wurden Aufnahmen einer Performance von mir beim „Lichtnächte“-Festival 2011 verarbeitet – inklusive Publikumsgeräuschen und der Akustik des Aufführungsortes: das „Mortuarium“ (Grablege) im Eichstätter Dom.

Pulsar

The fascination for drone phenomena and the wish to actively examine them were important incentives for my path into Electroacoustic Music. „Pulsar“ is the attempt to make a repetitively pulsating noise loop function like a drone texture by treating it tonally. / Ein wichtiger Impuls für meinen Weg in die elektroakustische Musik war die Faszination durch Drone-Phänomene und der Wunsch nach aktiver Auseinandersetzung mit ihnen. „Pulsar“ ist der Versuch, einen repetitiv pulsierenden Geräusch-Loop durch klangliche Bearbeitung wie eine Drone-Textur wirken zu lassen.

KLONK: For the Birds (CD-R)

Klonk
„For the Birds“
cdr, 30 min

Released on Recordings for the Summer, May 2017

Order via Fragment Factory or Tochnit Aleph

„I am for the birds,
not for the cages
in which people
sometimes place them.“
– John Cage

„For the Birds“ is the first album by interdisciplinary art duo KLONK (Tine Klink and Gerald Fiebig). The 5 pieces, mainly based on their multimedia installation work, use the sounds of birds to explore our relationship to nature and its simulation.

When working with field recordings, birdsong can seem almost omnipresent in natural surroundings. In turn, recorded birdsong has become something of a cliché of natural ambience, heard in everything from „relaxation“ CDs to computer games.

All 5 pieces on „For the Birds“ make use of birdsong, recorded both from nature and from other media, and mix it with various natural and artificial sounds – church bells, metal percussion played on an object found in a nature reserve, a bird whistle, bicycle bells, and the sounds of hedgehogs, bees, and other insects.

By increasingly disrupting the quasi-natural flow of ambient sounds by using loops, cuts, and drop-outs, the album deconstructs the idea of an unmediated nature. The listener begins to hear that what is nature to us is always a cultural construct.

8-page booklet, layout by Michael Barthel.